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Boy's 2015 FCA National High School Team

2015 Cropped 2

Kneeling (L to R) Sam Harnisch, Forry Smith, Luke Desperito, Terry Lindsay, Avery Myers, Ryan McNulty, Christian Ford, Jack Pezzula, Nick McEvoy, Alex DeMarco Second Row (L to R) Coach Glen Miles, Coach Drew Wardlow, Colin Hayek, Cal Costa, Kevin Quigley, Patrick Lyons, Jack Wilson, Dan Varello, Patrick McIlroy, John Railey, Jack Welding, Coach Max Schmidt, Coach Jed Yousefi

From 3d Rising 

LAKE PLACID, N.Y. — Champions were crowned in the Scholastic Divisions at the 26th annual Lake Placid Summit Lacrosse Classic, a once-fledgling tournament that has become a bustling celebration of the sport and a regular summer getaway for many of the best players at all levels of the sport as well their families.

The Boys 2016-2017 Gold Division championship was an action-packed display of high level lacrosse, as the FCA National High School team edged the SweetLax 2016 National team 7-6. It was a rematch of two programs that met last year with different rosters in the same division. FCA had to overcome a two-goal deficit in the first half to take the win.

Based in Baltimore, the FCA club was led by Avery Myers, a rising senior midfielder from Gonzaga College High School (Washington, D.C.) who scored three goals in the heavy-weight slugfest.

“You always hear about FCA versus SweetLax in Placid and it’s just been THE game for four or five years,” said Myers, who will attend and play lacrosse at Michigan after graduating from high school.

“FCA has built up such a tradition of winning, losing only one game in the last five years. I think it’s huge for us to come out there and be down early in the first half and come back and win it. We talked about adversity, and we talked about how our team could come together, and work together for a win.”

Assistant tournament director Kevin Leveille, recently retired from Major League Lacrosse, addressed each of the winning boys teams Wednesday afternoon.

“Every year I watch this tournament, the championship games just keep getting better and the level of skill and competition just keeps improving,” said Leveille, who’s father George co-founded the tournament with Mike DeRossi in 1990.